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On Corporatism And #Hillary2016

28 April 2015 @ 20:22

As you probably know, ‘Corporatism’ is just another name for Fascism*.

Here is a list of corporate donors to the RICO-tainted Slush Fund known as the Clinton Foundation, via a report filed by Leftist Jonathan Allen over at Vox.  Read it and weep…

Clinton Foundation donor Gave between this much* And this much*
Microsoft/Gates Foundation $26,000,000 No limit reported
Walmart/Walton Foundation $2,250,000 $10,500,000
Coca-Cola $5,000,000 $10,000,000
State of Qatar and related entities $1,375,000 $5,800,000
Goldman Sachs $1,250,000 $5,500,000
Dow Chemical $1,025,000 $5,050,000
Pfizer $1,010,000 $5,025,000
Duke Energy Corporation $1,002,000 $5,010,000
ExxonMobil $1,001,000 $5,005,000
Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa $1,000,000 $5,000,000
Hewlett-Packard $1,000,000 $5,000,000
Nima Taghavi $1,000,000 $5,000,000
NRG Energy $1,000,000 $5,000,000
Open Society Institute $1,000,000 $5,000,000
Procter & Gamble $1,000,000 $5,000,000
Boeing $1,000,000 $5,000,000
OCP $1,000,000 $5,000,000
Nike $512,000 $1,035,000
Google $511,000 $1,030,000
Daimler $510,000 $1,025,000
Monsanto $501,250 $1,006,000
Arizona State University $500,000 $1,000,000
Chevron $500,000 $1,000,000
General Electric $500,000 $1,000,000
Morgan Stanley $360,000 $775,000
Intel $252,000 $510,000
Noble Energy $250,000 $500,000
Sony $175,000 $400,000
AstraZeneca $150,000 $350,000
Bloomberg and Bloomberg Philanthropies $150,000 $350,000
Salesforce.com $125,000 $300,000
Verizon $118,000 $300,000
Yahoo $125,000 $300,000
Lockheed Martin $111,000 $280,000
Qualcomm $103,000 $265,000
TIAA-CREF $103,000 $265,000
JP Morgan $102,000 $260,000
Accenture $100,000 $250,000
American Cancer Society $100,000 $250,000
Applied Materials $100,000 $250,000
CH2M Hill $100,000 $250,000
Corning $100,000 $250,000
FedEx $100,000 $250,000
Gap $100,000 $250,000
Gilead $100,000 $250,000
Hess Corporation $100,000 $250,000
Humanity United $100,000 $250,000
Hyundai $100,000 $250,000
Int’l Brotherhood of Electrical Workers $100,000 $250,000
Johnson Controls $100,000 $250,000
Lions Clubs International $100,000 $250,000
Mylan $100,000 $250,000
Pepsi $100,000 $250,000
Sanofi-Aventis $100,000 $250,000
Starwood Hotels $100,000 $250,000
United States Pharmacopeial Convention $100,000 $250,000
UPS $100,000 $250,000
Washington University, St. Louis $100,000 $250,000
Time Warner $75,000 $150,000
Hunt Alternatives $60,000 $125,000
Ericsson $51,000 $105,000
Abbott Laboratories $50,000 $100,000
Anadarko $50,000 $100,000
BT Group $50,000 $100,000
Discovery Communications $50,000 $100,000
Earth Networks $50,000 $100,000
Feed the Children $50,000 $100,000
General Motors $50,000 $100,000
Hilton $50,000 $100,000
Marriott $50,000 $100,000
NextEra Energy $50,000 $100,000
NOUR USA $50,000 $100,000
Novozymes $50,000 $100,000
Oceana $50,000 $100,000
Starbucks $50,000 $100,000
Teck Resources $50,000 $100,000
The American Institute of Architects $50,000 $100,000
Nature Conservancy $50,000 $100,000
Trilogy International Partners $50,000 $100,000
Unilever $50,000 $100,000
World Vision $50,000 $100,000
S.C. Johnson & Son $50,000 $100,000
Motorola $35,000 $75,000
Enel $35,000 $75,000
JCPenney $27,000 $60,000
Target $27,000 $60,000
Novartis $26,000 $55,000
Prudential $26,000 $55,000
3M $25,000 $50,000
AAR $25,000 $50,000
AFL-CIO $25,000 $50,000
APCO Worldwide $25,000 $50,000
AREVA $25,000 $50,000
Bayer $20,000 $50,000
Capstone Turbine $25,000 $50,000
Cemex $25,000 $50,000
CHF International $25,000 $50,000
Eli Lilly $25,000 $50,000
Georgetown University $25,000 $50,000
HBO $25,000 $50,000
Honeywell $25,000 $50,000
Mars, Inc. $25,000 $50,000
McGraw-Hill Financial $25,000 $50,000
MWH Global $25,000 $50,000
New Venture Fund $25,000 $50,000
Partners HealthCare $25,000 $50,000
Rotary Foundation $25,000 $50,000
Shell $25,000 $50,000
Special Olympics $25,000 $50,000
Brink’s $25,000 $50,000
United Technologies Corporation $25,000 $50,000
Viacom $25,000 $50,000
Wildlife Conservation Society $25,000 $50,000
Ze-gen $25,000 $50,000
AT&T $11,000 $30,000
BP $11,000 $30,000
SAP America $10,250 $26,000
Actavis $10,000 $25,000
ALFA $10,000 $25,000
American Iron and Steel Institute $10,000 $25,000
Amgen $10,000 $25,000
Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. $10,000 $25,000
BHP Billiton Limited $10,000 $25,000
Chesapeake Energy Corporation $10,000 $25,000
ConocoPhillips $10,000 $25,000
Danfoss $10,000 $25,000
Delphi Financial Group $10,000 $25,000
Digital Globe $10,000 $25,000
Dow Corning $10,000 $25,000
EMD Serono $10,000 $25,000
Entertainment Software Association $10,000 $25,000
Herbalife $10,000 $25,000
Hermitage Capital Management $10,000 $25,000
InnoVida Holdings $10,000 $25,000
Levi Strauss & Co. $10,000 $25,000
Life Technologies $10,000 $25,000
Motion Picture Association of America $10,000 $25,000
Nokia $10,000 $25,000
Occidental Petroleum $10,000 $25,000
Sesame Workshop $10,000 $25,000
Siemens $10,000 $25,000
SNCF $10,000 $25,000
Symantec $10,000 $25,000
Tamares Management $10,000 $25,000
Telefonica International $10,000 $25,000
Hershey $10,000 $25,000
NASDAQ OMX Group $10,000 $25,000
The Pew Charitable Trusts $10,000 $25,000
TV Azteca, S.A. DE C.V. $10,000 $25,000
US Chamber of Commerce $10,000 $25,000
Whirlpool $10,000 $25,000
Oneida Indian Nation $10,000 $25,000
American Public Health Association $5,000 $10,000
EOS Foundation $5,000 $10,000
Florida International University $5,000 $10,000
Girl Scouts of the USA $5,000 $10,000
Gonzalo Tirado $5,000 $10,000
NBC Universal $5,000 $10,000
Santa Monica College $5,000 $10,000
Sensis $5,000 $10,000
Adobe Systems $1,000 $5,000
Boston Scientific Corporation $1,000 $5,000
Bristol-Myers Squibb $1,000 $5,000
Cablevision Systems Corporation $1,000 $5,000
Caterpillar $1,000 $5,000
Chicanos Por La Causa $1,000 $5,000
Deere & Company $1,000 $5,000
Dell $1,000 $5,000
Edison Electric Institute $1,000 $5,000
Eligio Cedeno $1,000 $5,000
Festo Corporation $1,000 $5,000
George Mason University $1,000 $5,000
Laborers Int’l Union of North America $1,000 $5,000
Nestle $1,000 $5,000
Northrop Grumman Corporation $1,000 $5,000
American Legion $1,000 $5,000
Association for Manufacturing Technology $1,000 $5,000
Tohono O’odham Nation $1,000 $5,000
Hara Software $1,000 $5,000
Oracle (matching grant program) $250 $1,000
Nova Southeastern University $250 $1,000

* The Clinton Foundation reports contributions in ranges.

America is not yet fully Fascist, but it is headed down the one way road to it.

__________________________________
*FASCISM as accurately defined by Sheldon Richman in the The Concise Encyclopedia Of Economics, Liberty Fund:

As an economic system, fascism is socialism with a capitalist veneer. The word derives from fasces, the Roman symbol of collectivism and power: a tied bundle of rods with a protruding ax. In its day (the 1920s and 1930s), fascism was seen as the happy medium between boom-and-bust-prone liberal capitalism, with its alleged class conflict, wasteful competition, and profit-oriented egoism, and revolutionary Marxism, with its violent and socially divisive persecution of the bourgeoisie. Fascism substituted the particularity of nationalism and racialism—“blood and soil”—for the internationalism of both classical liberalism and Marxism.

Where socialism sought totalitarian control of a society’s economic processes through direct state operation of the means of production, fascism sought that control indirectly, through domination of nominally private owners. Where socialism nationalized property explicitly, fascism did so implicitly, by requiring owners to use their property in the “national interest”—that is, as the autocratic authority conceived it. (Nevertheless, a few industries were operated by the state.) Where socialism abolished all market relations outright, fascism left the appearance of market relations while planning all economic activities. Where socialism abolished money and prices, fascism controlled the monetary system and set all prices and wages politically. In doing all this, fascism denatured the marketplace. Entrepreneurship was abolished. State ministries, rather than consumers, determined what was produced and under what conditions.

Fascism embodied corporatism, in which political representation was based on trade and industry rather than on geography. In this, fascism revealed its roots in syndicalism, a form of socialism originating on the left. The government cartelized firms of the same industry, with representatives of labor and management serving on myriad local, regional, and national boards—subject always to the final authority of the dictator’s economic plan. Corporatism was intended to avert unsettling divisions within the nation, such as lockouts and union strikes. The price of such forced “harmony” was the loss of the ability to bargain and move about freely.

5 Comments leave one →
  1. Adobe_Walls permalink
    28 April 2015 @ 21:25 21:25

    In 1934 Hitler was asked in an interview why he had not yet socialized industry, he replied that it wasn’t necessary as he had already socialized the people. Food for thought there.

  2. Shermlaw (RS) permalink
    28 April 2015 @ 21:26 21:26

    The main difference between Marxist and Fascist economics is that fascist systems control consumption rather than production. The “market” reorients itself to produce what the state wants to buy with public funds. Instead of the state decreeing that X number of tanks will be produced, it simply says, “the state wishes to buy X number of tanks.” For the consumer, the end result is the same: no butter because everybody’s making guns.

  3. 29 April 2015 @ 11:31 11:31

    Not surprised. The difference between Hitler and the Communists was the political class in Germany thought they could control Hitler.

  4. 29 April 2015 @ 14:39 14:39

    But isn’t Hillary campaigning on the idea that we need to get the money out of politics?

    • thecampofthesaints permalink
      29 April 2015 @ 14:48 14:48

      It would seem she is campaigning to get it out of politics and into her and Bill’s pockets.

      On Wed, Apr 29, 2015 at 2:39 PM, The Camp Of The Saints wrote:

      >

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