Skip to content

Bob’s Musings: Dismal Truths And Kinky Boots

10 July 2012 @ 14:53

Bob’s Muse

-There’s a lot going on regarding the Kimberlin/Rauhauser Cell, which I will post about later today, but I wanted to touch on some other stories first.

Philip Klein is right on the money [tip of the fedora to Doug Brady]:

When I originally wrote my column for today’s print edition on the political implications of the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the mandate as a constitutional exercise of Congress’s taxing power, the Romney campaign’s public position was that the mandate was a penalty. Between the time of my deadline and the time the column went to press, however, Mitt Romney reversed his campaign’s position and said on CBS that the federal mandate was, in fact, a tax. At the same time, he strained to argue that the mandate he signed in Massachusetts was not a tax. The Wall Street Journal is out today with an editorial blasting Romney for running a terrible campaign. But what’s happening isn’t the campaign’s fault. No matter how brilliant the campaign staff is, they can’t change the fact that Romney championed and signed a health care law in Massachusetts that was remarkably similar to President Obama’s national health care law.

In April 2010, just weeks after the national health care law passed, I warned that if Republicans nominated Romney in 2012, it could kill the effort to repeal Obamacare, precisely because he wouldn’t be able to credibly attack Obama on health care. It’s something that I emphasized repeatedly during the primaries and discussed in my ebook on the Romney nomination. Had Republicans nominated any other GOP candidate, right now they’d be sitting back and watching Obama and his surrogates squirm in trying to explain why the mandate was a tax for legal purposes but still didn’t violate his middle class tax pledge. Instead, Romney’s struggles to reconcile the irreconcilable are complicating things.

People like Mr. Klein, the vast majority of readers of TCOTS, and I warned the GOP repeatedly, but they didn’t give a good Goddamn and now they’re stuck with a guy who fathered Obamacare’s father.

We conservatives are left with this dismal truth, as Mr. Klein says:

All of this said, the current reality is that the only remaining hope of repealing Obamacare is for Romney to become president. Though Romney’s own efforts to attack the law will inevitably be weakened by his own past embrace of the mandate/regulate/subsidize approach to health care, there’s no reason why his sordid past on health care policy should become toxic to the entire Republican Party.

The sad thing is: our only hope lies in the GOP responding to our relentless pressure.

-If you want the straight poop on the whole Global Warming / Climate Change / [whatever it’s being called this week] controversy, the best place I’ve found to go is The Pirate’s Cove. William Teach sifts through all the muck and confusion and puts it all in a form that’s understandable, and his analysis is always informative.

In one of his latest postings, he succinctly dispels the frantic claim being made that the recent weather conditions in America are ‘perfect examples’ of Globull Warming.

-Stephanie Miller, the Ohio woman who was consoled by Barack Hussein Obama as she sobbed a ‘Thank You’ for Obamacare, apparently is afflicted with a dual personality — one of which is a raging Leftist shrew [but this side of her only comes out, it seems, when her brain is plugged into her Twitter feed].

Proof once again — as if any more was needed — that redhead’s sure is crazy.

Twitchy has the details here and here, and Howard Towt here over at Anti-Republican Culture [tip of the fedora to Stacy McCain for the latter].

There are the times when you really appreciate The Army Of Davids.

-Last week, John Hawkins published 6 Reasons People Love Zombie Flicks and he nail’s it. Here’s the one I think is the biggest reason why so many of us like these kind of stories:

1) You can plausibly be the hero. The problem with most action flicks is that the average person has trouble picturing himself as the hero. He doesn’t have special training or powers. He’s not a CIA operative, a Navy SEAL, a gunfighter, or a mutant. So, the idea of taking on a gang of Die Hard style terrorists or fighting with a sword against the medieval equivalent of Chuck Liddell in a film like Gladiator is completely outside of his reality.

On the other hand, zombies are most often portrayed as extremely slow and stupid, yet still dangerous. That makes zombies an enemy that the average restaurant manager or accountant feels like he could realistically handle. Every man, in his heart, wants to be a hero. He wants to be John Wayne, he wants to be Rambo, he wants to be Bruce Lee. In a world filled with zombies, that’s an achievable goal.

The first zombie flick I ever saw was The Last Man On Earth starring Vincent Price. In addition to scaring the beejesus out of me when I was about ten, I loved imagining myself as Price’s character. It’s a cheaply made and horribly dubbed Italian film, but it’s creepy as Hell.

-In the Hmmm…I Thought So department: from Ron Radosh we learn that the story that Kirk Douglas broke the ‘Hollywood Blacklist’ is a myth.

Put that in your dimple, Kirk, and suck on it.

BTW: Am I the only person who finds his public appearances since he had his stroke unseemly? A gentleman does not subject others to such a condition.

-It’s nice to find someone who remembers the great Walter Johnson, and it’s even sweeter because it’s Thomas Sowell:

Walter Johnson is the only pitcher to pitch more than a hundred shutouts in his career — 110, in fact. Playing for a team that was not always among the best, he pitched more than one-fourth of his 416 career victories for shutouts.

With even the greatest pitchers of our era seldom going the full nine innings, Walter Johnson’s 110 shutouts seems to be the baseball record least likely to be broken. In order to compare the pitchers of our time with those of the past, earned-run averages may have to be used.

Walter Johnson’s lifetime earned-run average was 2.17. Christy Mathewson had a lifetime ERA of 2.13, but Mathewson played for better teams. It is hard to think of any other pitcher’s lifetime record that tops theirs, except for records based on sheer longevity, like Cy Young’s 511 victories. Cy Young had a lifetime ERA of 2.63 — obviously great, but not the greatest.

There has been no other pitcher with such an all-around talent ever since.

Mark Steyn:

George Leef over at NRO’s Phi Beta Cons had a teasing link to this exciting news earlier today:

Harvard has appointed Vanidy “Van” Bailey as the College’s first permanent director of bisexual, gay, lesbian, transgender, and queer student life. Bailey, the assistant director for education at the University of California, San Diego, will assume the new position on July 16.

Alas, this long overdue shattering of the BGLTQ ceiling was marred by the Harvard Crimson’s grossly insensitive coverage:

An earlier version of this article used the pronoun “she” to refer to Vanidy “Van” Bailey, the newly appointed director of bisexual, gay, lesbian, transgender, and queer student life. In fact, Bailey prefers not to be referred to by any gendered pronoun.

I’ll bet Elizabeth Warren is kicking herself for not thinking of that one.

Vanidy, thy name is…er…ah…forget it.

-Live Well, My Friends…

One Comment
  1. 09 February 2014 @ 09:32 09:32

    Biotin is important nutrient for nails and if the same is not present in perfect measure
    then brittle nails come into existence. With gas prices climbing sky high
    and employment still at it’s peak, more and more women are looking for easy
    ways to cut corners. Next, take your third color and paint a diagonal
    line going the opposite way.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: