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I Got Egypted

03 February 2011 @ 17:54

This is how I feel right about now…

I was planning on not posting about Egypt for a day, hoping to have some time to ponder the situation and, also, move on to some other subjects.  The goings-on over there have pretty much taken up all my free time this week, allowing for very few blog posts on other matters, and I wanted to give you, my beloved readers, and myself a break.

But that was not to be…

-Events will not allow a respite as they keep on moving at a good clip, showing no signs of slowing-down or quieting, despite Little Barry’s knees-bent running about and bouncing behavior.

-The Left in The West is horrified that there are pro-Mubarak Regime people in the streets and that they may be hired guns of the fading leader.  In his first report of today, Stacy McCain unmasks the hypocrisy of them:

If this were a socialist regime cracking down on its opposition — e.g., Chavez in Venezuela – the Left would shrug and say something about breaking eggs to make an omelet. But what the Left accepts when done on behalf of the “proletariat,” it finds intolerable when done without such a revolutionary pretext. Or, as Lenin put it: Who, whom?

As he further states:

To the Left, American interests are inherently illegitimate, which is why the Left sides with the anti-Mubarak protesters even when those protesters shout “jihad” in the streets of Cairo.

If Islamic jihad is bad for America, the leftist reckons, Islamic jihad can’t be all bad. So, mirroring their Cold War stance, the Left in the 21st century may be described as anti-anti-jihad. (And Pamela Geller is Joe McCarthy!)

Indeed.  I believe their behavior is following Chapter 12 in The Leftist Playbook to the letter.  The Left has made common cause with the Jihadists.  They can’t declare this alliance too openly, however.  So they wait for the right situations to arise and then pontificate as if they were pure of heart and without guile — ‘We support the people’s right to democracy, to determine their own futures!’.  This makes the Left seem that they are advocating for freedom and liberty and justice for all, but, in fact, they are advocating for the freedom of their elitist totalitarian comrades to be at liberty to determine the futures of the unEnlightened masses.

-Dan Collins has a different take that is well-worth a read.

-DaTechguy has published a good bit of analysis aggregation [and I say that not because he quoted me — although that certainly has added some additional luster to his blogging triumph].

-I WILL UPDATE THIS POSTING AFTER DINNER.

UPDATE at 1853…

-In another posting from later in the morning, Stacy reports on, among other things, the continuing amateurish actions of a adolescent-addled Administration:

Notice that the White House spent Monday and Tuesday trying to make Obama the protagonist of the Egyptian drama. After Obama’s speech Tuesday, violence erupted Wednesday in Cairo. Now the White House is trying to keep the president off the stage.

That word I used yesterday, ‘feckless’, come to mind again.

-Also, please do check out this video of some of the goings-on in Cairo yesterday amidst the crowds.

I have to admit that, whenever I watch people rioting, I find myself instinctively rooting for the forces of order.

-In the course of a very astute observation, Mike, proprietor of ThatMrGuy, labels the situation in Egypt a ‘red hot mess’.  Spot-on.

-All of us who have been commenting on the situation have been analyzing and discussing the Egyptian Army.  Over at Big Peace, retired Naval Officer CDR Salamander fills us in on the culture that permeates this organization.  A highlight:

While some are shocked that the Egyptian army isn’t following the example of other Arab armies from Syria to Jordan in the second-half of the 20th Century – really they shouldn’t be.

Unlike the pre-Camp David Egyptian army and those of Syria’s Asad and the King Hussein of Jordan’s – the leadership of today’s Egyptian army carries with it an American flavor, a flavor seeped in over three decades of close association. Exactly the opposite of what Hollyweird and the anti-School of the Americas crowd would have you think, never before in history has there been an military with a better political and humanitarian ethos that ours.

There’s much more, so please do take the time to click here and read the whole article.

-From Kathryn Jean Lopez we learn that The New York Times continues to act as Useful Idiots for the Jihadists by asserting that the Muslim Brotherhood is just like the Catholic Church.

-It’s time to play WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO…? 

Today we ask: What Ever Happened To Mohamed El-Baradei [trans: ‘Mohamed The Stooge’]?

Stacy has the answer in a posting entitled: CNN’s Choice, Not Egypt’s

In a report that he will continue to update this evening, Stace has details on the interview Mubarak gave today, speculation on what his son, Gamal, has been up to, and much, much more.

12 Comments
  1. 03 February 2011 @ 19:31 19:31

    Didn’t these riots partially start because of a food shortage? The Egyptian currency goes up and down with the US dollar. With all of this “quantitative easing” Bernanke has been doing, the US dollar has been losing value and with it, the Egyptian currency. Money’s worth less, so it doesn’t buy what it did before. Everything costs more. Egyptians started rioting because they were hungry. You could make a case for laying this at the feet of Obama and his administration, and in particular, Bernanke.

    What say you?

    Mike

  2. Adobe Walls permalink
    03 February 2011 @ 21:00 21:00

    I’ve no doubt that these riots were completely spontaneous in part inspired by Tunisia, food prices being only one of a host conditions liable to piss off a society. I don’t think the MB had a hand in starting or at least in the beginning in encouraging the rioters. However the longer they continue and overall conditions deteriorate the stronger their influence will become. For instance, the supply of food at least to the city centers must be running very low. It was the Muslim Brotherhood who fed people after an earthquake a few years ago. If the people who are refusing to leave Tahiri Square remain there for any length of time (they have sworn to stay until Mubarak leaves) one might wonder how they are getting food.
    Given that most of the buildings around the square are guarded by the army now, I imagine waste disposal is becoming problematic.

  3. 03 February 2011 @ 21:24 21:24

    Unlike the pre-Camp David Egyptian army and those of Syria’s Asad and the King Hussein of Jordan’s – the leadership of today’s Egyptian army carries with it an American flavor, a flavor seeped in over three decades of close association. Exactly the opposite of what Hollyweird and the anti-School of the Americas crowd would have you think, never before in history has there been an military with a better political and humanitarian ethos that ours.

    In response to this, I recall when I was in basic training and into my Radar tech school, that we were training not only Iranians, but also Saudis and Egyptians. This was back in the early seventies. I believe these people were officers because I don’t believe these countries would send rank and file recruits overseas for training.

    Mike

  4. Adjoran permalink
    04 February 2011 @ 01:50 01:50

    I believe the first demonstrations a week or so ago were protesting the steeply increasing food prices. It’s not scarce, just expensive. You see, converting large amounts of the corn market to subsidized ethanol production instead of food caused corn to spike in price but, economics being what it is, other food staples follow suit as the corn demand turns to rice and wheat. Add to this the built-in increases forced by rising energy and transportation costs, and you can see how Obama is creating crises not only here, but around the world.

    When Obama came out early on the “Mubarak must go NOW” side, I instinctively knew the only correct policy was “Mubarak should stay.”

    The cause of the Egyptian people, the American people, and all the world’s people would be best served if Obama resigned NOW.

  5. Adobe Walls permalink
    04 February 2011 @ 09:40 09:40

    So we need for some Irregular Calvery to head to DC?

  6. 04 February 2011 @ 16:23 16:23

    This makes the Left seem that they are advocating for freedom and liberty and justice for all …

    You are right of course, that the left wants nothing to do with freedom, but here is a shining example of why the left more often than not wins the rhetorical wars. As I read throughout the conservative blogosphere and media, I get a very unsettling feeling … Right or wrong, the perception is that of unquestioned support for Mubarak, a man who deserves the most hideous things Hell has to offer. It breaks my heart.

    Yes, there is good reason to fear the unknown over there, but that should not result in the support of pure, unadulterated evil. I mean … We rail against Obama, but Murabak is alright? Obama is John Adams and Thomas Jefferson rolled into one in comparison to Murabak. We’ve grown too comfortable with evil in this country. May God have mercy on our souls.

    I have to admit that, whenever I watch people rioting, I find myself instinctively rooting for the forces of order.

    All too often, those “forces of order” are the most chaotic forces of all. The “forces of order” are responsible for the deaths of over 200,000,000 unique, individual souls during the 20th century alone (it wasn’t only communism).

    Here is what I fear … Hunger and greater poverty is coming to America. Inflation will prove disastrous. The police state is clamping down. The “right” is showing more and more willingness to use and support violence, particularly when it comes from “authority.” The left is also increasing its calls for violence. Neither side is interested in peace anymore. The Prince of Peace has been buried under a cement floor.

    They killed the republic in 1913 … We’re now knocking on the death of democracy’s door … It only gets more tyrannical from here.

  7. Adobe Walls permalink
    04 February 2011 @ 18:47 18:47

    CL, I wrote this the other day here at “Egypt: Camel Jockeying For Position”

    “If this uprising were put down and it cost 100,000 lives. That would still be a bargain at four times that price compared to what happens when Egypt get’s one or at most two “free” elections. A Gaza strip with 80 million people, astride the Suez, and armed with F-16s and A1A1 tanks which they make there (I assume/hope they can’t make all of the electronics).”
    Nobody gets to wear a white hat in this western it is my firm and absolute belief that Islam is the greatest evil ever. It’s not possible to do the right thing. Compared to the Ayatollahs Mubarak is a piker. I’m not sure if Armageddon brings the second coming of Christ. but I have no doubt that if Islam as currently configured exists, if the current trends of increasing Islamic Fascism there will be Armageddon. Being forced to choose between Autocracy or Theocracy I’ll back the minor tyrant over the major tyrants. While the former shames us the latter WILL KILL US.
    In this case we don’t have the choices we imagine, Mubarak is dying by many accounts there is some evidence that there is a distinction between “the Government” and “the Military” we as a People, a Nation and probably least of all our Government has no credibility with any one who matters or will matter in the near future in Egypt.

  8. 04 February 2011 @ 20:00 20:00

    If this uprising were put down and it cost 100,000 lives.

    This is where we differ. I don’t believe in playing god with other people’s lives. I leave that to guys like Mao, Stalin, and Bill Kristol. Scratch that. Kristol is a sissy.

    People in foreign lands are not pawns on your chessboard. Believing that they are is the real reason they hate us. Think about it … We invade, bomb and kill people while expecting them to love us for it. The Muslim Brotherhood or Taliban on the other hand … feeds the poor and fights the invaders. Hey, they may be evil, but they’re a lot smarter than we are!

    “Spreading democracy” is more Utopian than the War on Poverty. It’s a fool’s game that has put Americans in more danger than simply letting the world take its natural course. It is doubtful for example, that Iran would be the dangerous Islamic regime it is today, if we hadn’t arbitrarily overthrown their democratically elected president and installed a brutal dictator. You see, people hate brutal dictators … But here we are again … We did the same thing in Egypt that we did in Iran, and once again, it may very well come back to haunt us.

    What was that Einstein said about doing the same thing over and over while expecting different results?

    Our current foreign policy suffers from what Hayek called the “fatal conceit.” Maybe one day we’ll learn that we are not gods. Unfortunately, it’ll probably be too late.

  9. Adobe Walls permalink
    04 February 2011 @ 21:22 21:22

    CL, do you consider yourself an idealist?

  10. 05 February 2011 @ 10:24 10:24

    CL, do you consider yourself an idealist?

    An idealist believes he can play god, “spread democracy,” control other people’s political processes, mass slaughter 100,000 people, and rule the world. I believe in none of that garbage. Stalin and Mao were idealists. Apparently, so are you.

    Our Wilsonian/neocon foreign policy has consequences. It is radical, not prudent. It is Utopian, not practical. It creates enemies where there otherwise were none. It puts us in danger and makes us less safe. It is the fatal conceit that keeps people from grasping the reality of its grave “unintended” consequences.

  11. Rene Emile permalink
    08 February 2011 @ 20:52 20:52

    Hmmm… Anybody that understands Arabs, knows they understand only one thing, Force!
    So another dictator would be good to the US, and sending the tanks and mowing 1000 people like in 1972 Morocco IS the only solution.

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