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Mike Rowe Gets It

09 September 2012 @ 20:06

Mike Rowe, best known as the host of TV’s Dirty Jobs, has penned an open letter to Mitt Romney [which he has read and liked, it seems] that is worth quoting in full:

Dear Governor Romney,

My name is Mike Rowe and I own a small company in California called mikeroweWORKS. Currently, mikeroweWORKS is trying to close the country’s skills gap by changing the way Americans feel about Work. (I know, right? Ambitious.) Anyway, this Labor Day is our 4th anniversary, and I’m commemorating the occasion with an open letter to you. If you read the whole thing, I’ll vote for you in November.

First things first. mikeroweWORKS grew out of a TV show called Dirty Jobs. If by some chance you are not glued to The Discovery Channel every Wednesday at 10pm, allow me to visually introduce myself. That’s me on the right, preparing to do something dirty.

When Dirty Jobs premiered back in 2003, critics called the show “a calamity of exploding toilets and misadventures in animal husbandry.” They weren’t exactly wrong. But mostly, Dirty Jobs was an unscripted celebration of hard work and skilled labor. It still is. Every week, we highlight regular people who do the kind of jobs most people go out of their way to avoid. My role on the show is that of a “perpetual apprentice.” In that capacity I have completed over three hundred different jobs, visited all fifty states, and worked in every major industry.

Though schizophrenic and void of any actual qualifications, my resume looks pretty impressive, and when our economy officially crapped the bed in 2008, I was perfectly positioned to weigh in on a variety of serious topics. A reporter from The Wall Street Journal called to ask what I thought about the “counter-intuitive correlation between rising unemployment and the growing shortage of skilled labor.” CNBC wanted my take on outsourcing. Fox News wanted my opinions on manufacturing and infrastructure. And CNN wanted to chat about currency valuations, free trade, and just about every other work-related problem under the sun.

In each case, I shared my theory that most of these “problems” were in fact symptoms of something more fundamental – a change in the way Americans viewed hard work and skilled labor. That’s the essence of what I’ve heard from the hundreds of men and women I’ve worked with on Dirty Jobs. Pig farmers, electricians, plumbers, bridge painters, jam makers, blacksmiths, brewers, coal miners, carpenters, crab fisherman, oil drillers…they all tell me the same thing over and over, again and again – our country has become emotionally disconnected from an essential part of our workforce. We are no longer impressed with cheap electricity, paved roads, and indoor plumbing. We take our infrastructure for granted, and the people who build it.

Today, we can see the consequences of this disconnect in any number of areas, but none is more obvious than the growing skills gap. Even as unemployment remains sky high, a whole category of vital occupations has fallen out of favor, and companies struggle to find workers with the necessary skills. The causes seem clear. We have embraced a ridiculously narrow view of education. Any kind of training or study that does not come with a four-year degree is now deemed “alternative.” Many viable careers once aspired to are now seen as “vocational consolation prizes,” and many of the jobs this current administration has tried to “create” over the last four years are the same jobs that parents and teachers actively discourage kids from pursuing. (I always thought there something ill-fated about the promise of three million “shovel ready jobs” made to a society that no longer encourages people to pick up a shovel.)

Which brings me to my purpose in writing. On Labor Day of 2008, the fans of Dirty Jobs helped me launch this website. mikeroweWORKS.com began as a Trade Resource Center designed to connect kids with careers in the skilled trades. It has since evolved into a non-profit foundation – a kind of PR Campaign for hard work and skilled labor. Thanks to a number of strategic partnerships, I have been able to promote a dialogue around these issues with a bit more credibility than my previous resume allowed. I’ve spoken to Congress (twice) about the need to confront the underlying stigmas and stereotypes that surround these kinds of jobs. Alabama and Georgia have both used mikeroweWORKS to launch their own statewide technical recruitment campaigns, and I’m proud to be the spokesman for both initiatives. I also work closely with Caterpillar, Ford, Kimberly-Clark, and Master Lock, as well as The Boy Scouts of America and The Future Farmers of America. To date, the mikeroweWORKS Foundation has raised over a million dollars for trade scholarships. It’s modest by many standards, but I think we’re making a difference.

Certainly, we need more jobs, and you were clear about that in Tampa. But the Skills Gap proves that we need something else too. We need people who see opportunity where opportunity exists. We need enthusiasm for careers that have been overlooked and underappreciated by society at large. We need to have a really big national conversation about what we value in the workforce, and if I can be of help to you in that regard, I am at your service – assuming of course, you find yourself in a new address early next year.

To be clear, mikeroweWORKS has no political agenda. I am not an apologist for Organized Labor or for Management. mikeroweWORKS is concerned only with encouraging a larger appreciation for skilled labor, and supporting those kids who are willing to learn a skill.

Good luck in November. And thanks for your time.

Sincerely,
Mike Rowe

PS. In the interest of full disclosure I should mention that I wrote a similar letter to President Obama. Of course, that was four years ago, and since I never heard back, I believe proper etiquette allows me to extend the same offer to you now. I figure if I post it here, the odds are better that someone you know might send it along to your attention.

Very well put.

The Founding Fathers placed a very high value on education.  Many state constitutions charged their governments with promoting and/or creating institutions of learning.  The Public School System arose out of their efforts and the efforts of the next generation of leaders.

The idea of higher education as a noble pursuit became ingrained in the American Mind.

The Founders and those who came after them believed that the maintaining of the constitutional republic they created hinged, in part, on a well-informed citizenry.

As history has shown, they were right.

However, as so often happens, this good idea has been carried to it’s logical ends and has entered the realm of the absurd – and destructive.

As Mr. Rowe states:

In each case, I shared my theory that most of these “problems” were in fact symptoms of something more fundamental – a change in the way Americans viewed hard work and skilled labor. That’s the essence of what I’ve heard from the hundreds of men and women I’ve worked with on Dirty Jobs. Pig farmers, electricians, plumbers, bridge painters, jam makers, blacksmiths, brewers, coal miners, carpenters, crab fisherman, oil drillers…they all tell me the same thing over and over, again and again – our country has become emotionally disconnected from an essential part of our workforce. We are no longer impressed with cheap electricity, paved roads, and indoor plumbing. We take our infrastructure for granted, and the people who build it.

Today, we can see the consequences of this disconnect in any number of areas, but none is more obvious than the growing skills gap. Even as unemployment remains sky high, a whole category of vital occupations has fallen out of favor, and companies struggle to find workers with the necessary skills. The causes seem clear. We have embraced a ridiculously narrow view of education. Any kind of training or study that does not come with a four-year degree is now deemed “alternative.”…

Careers in the trades that were once considered respectable and jobs that were once understood and appreciated as necessary are now looked-down upon.  We’ve created a nation of be-ers and not doers.  Valuable skills and abilities, so necessary to maintaining the basic physical structures we rely on, are being lost.

The Left, no surprise has encouraged the ‘Every Person A College Grad’ mentality because they see higher education as a place where they can do their propagandizing in peace under the false facade of providing a ‘necessary’ education.  They have infected us with the idea that working with one’s hands is somehow degrading.  It is not and never has been.

The American Rebellion was led by men of learning like John Adams, but we forget [or are taught to ignore] that even a university-educated man like Mr. Adams also worked his own farm.  Ben Franklin set up and ran his printing press.  George Washington was a surveyor.  Roger Sherman worked as a cobbler.  Most of the Founding Fathers could and often had to know how to work with their hands.

Let us hope that Mitt Romney – like Mike Rowe, like The Founders – get’s it.

6 Comments leave one →
  1. 09 September 2012 @ 21:07 21:07

    For some time now the classification of America and Americans has been going on. It is mostly driven by the usual culprits and cults of personality that have sprung to life in the east and west coasts.
    Those of us in fly-over country, the so-called country class know better, but no elitist school will ever value us or our opinion; no main stream media will either, nor any of the so-called changers of culture ( Stewart, Leno, Rolling Stone, et.al. )
    We know the value of a rogue plumber whether it be a fictional Alfred Harry Tuttle or the real Samuel Joseph Wurzelbacher.
    Good letter Mike, lets hope this can open more eyes and minds

  2. theebl permalink
    09 September 2012 @ 21:26 21:26

    Well said Bob.

  3. allen permalink
    10 September 2012 @ 00:32 00:32

    I keep telling my niece (16) “get the skills a job building stuff, fixing stuff, or blowing sh!t up because no matter what happens, one of those skills will be needed by someone. somewhere.”

    so far she’s on “blowing sh!t up” because, well..it’s FUN. (clay pigeons turning to orange dust is her thing now) but I try to get her to understand the stuff “behind the wall”..electrical, plumbing, HVAC, ect…because if you learn one of those you will probably never be out of work.

  4. 10 September 2012 @ 10:30 10:30

    I always get a kick out of the “you need a degree” malarkey. After getting burned out following a dozen years in the COMEX trading pits, I decided to give college a try and discovered “higher education” was akin to attending the 13th grade (in many cases I had classmates who didn’t know things Sr. Carmelita of the Bloody Ruler had taught me in grammar school). So I bailed out, and now a good chunk of my business income is derived from “fixing” college kids’ papers.

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